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Local family buys downtown Dallas parcel prior to auction

DALLAS -- The former Safeway building, slated for auction, has been purchased by a Dallas family interested in transforming it from a run-down vacant building to a viable downtown asset.

May 21, 2013

DALLAS -- The former Safeway building, slated for auction, has been purchased by a Dallas family interested in transforming it from a run-down vacant building to a viable downtown asset.

Rod Buchanan, Buck Buchanan and Claudia Drill, along with two other family members, purchased the building May 13, two days before it was scheduled for a sealed-bid auction.

Rod Buchanan, who owns Shear Perfection Salon in Dallas, said the family decided to make an offer on the building outside of the auction to assure it stayed in local hands.

"It's a central point of Dallas," Buchanan said. "It needs to be taken care of."

The Buchanan family also owns a building at 177 Oak St. near the former Safeway at 820 SW Church St. and didn't want to see an investor without immediate plans buy the building.

"We watched the Praegitzer building go and we didn't want that to happen," Drill added, referring to the former TTM building sitting still largely vacant on Monmouth Cutoff Road.

To prevent that from happening, the family made an offer for more than the auction minimum bid of $175,000 to seller Umpqua Bank. The offer was accepted and the sale closed May 13.

Drill said the short-term plan is to clean and repair the building to make it usable as office space, or whatever other interest there may be for the location.

Rod Buchanan said it likely will be ready for new occupants in six months to a year.

"It was in better shape than we thought," Drill said of the 13,830-square-foot building built in 1963.

Buck Buchanan noted that one of the building's greatest assets is the ability to park between 50 to 55 cars in the former grocery store's parking lot.

Rod Buchanan noted the space can be divided and the family has already been approached by interested parties -- but nothing is solid yet.

"We bought it mainly because it's been an eyesore for a while and we think we have the ability and the uses for it down the road to make it presentable for Dallas again," he said. "We just didn't want it to go (to an owner) out of town and just have someone else sit on it for too long. We want to make it usable."

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