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Ex-city manager released from jail

DALLAS — Jerry Wyatt, the former Dallas city manager convicted of theft and misconduct in 2013, has been released from prison a year early.

Jerry Wyatt

Jerry Wyatt

February 04, 2014

DALLAS — Jerry Wyatt, the former Dallas city manager convicted of theft and misconduct in 2013, has been released from prison a year early.

Wyatt, who was sentenced to two years in prison on Jan. 31, 2013, left prison Jan. 27.

He was released on "early transition leave," a 90-day program allowing inmates to submit a plan for reintegration into their community — such as finding work and enrolling in school — that requires they be released.

Wyatt was approved for the program and will be under the supervision of Polk County Community Corrections throughout transitional leave, in addition to post-prison supervision ordered when he was sentenced.

Marty Silbernagel, community corrections director, said Wyatt will be supervised by his office until April 2015.

Wyatt's original release date was scheduled for January 2015 after he pleaded guilty to five charges: three counts of first-degree theft, one count of official misconduct and one count of falsifying business records.

He was originally charged with 17 crimes stemming from an investigation launched in June 2012.

The investigation began after a city employee reported what appeared to be suspicious purchases Wyatt made. Those purchases included items ranging from cellphones and workout DVDs for personal use to plane tickets and a hotel stay for a family trip. The Dallas Police Department soon determined the purchases were in fact theft.

The thefts amounted to more than $14,300 and took place over nearly three years. Wyatt resigned in July 2012 after being confronted about the purchases. He returned or repaid the city for all the purchases.

Silbernagel said Wyatt's early release was the result of making good use of his time in prison.

"He had seven months knocked off his sentence for good behavior," Silbernagel said, adding he was also part of an alternate incarceration plan that ultimately qualified him for early release.

Silbernagel said Wyatt could not participate in transitional leave if he had not been willing to go through treatment programs while serving his sentence.

"And he did quite well," he said.

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